BEng Automotive Engineering

Study our Automotive Engineering BEng degree course and join one of the select UK Universities to take part in Formula Student events at Silverstone.

Now is a fascinating time to study automotive engineering as you’ll have the chance to be at the forefront of developments within the industry. You’ll get to work in advanced automotive workshops and laboratories equipped with industry-standard equipment, as well as take advantage of more traditional office-based facilities.

You’ll gain practical experience so that you are equipped to apply engineering science to real life situations. Plus, you’ll also have the opportunity to join our BCU Formula Student racing team.

What’s covered in the course?

You’ll develop as an engineer able to make a significant contribution to this industry as it goes through an important period of transition in the UK and globally.

Our engineering courses focus on project-based activities, giving you lots of opportunity to work in teams on projects from design to implementation. This will give you practical experience of applying engineering science to real world problems, working in multidisciplinary teams to develop your interpersonal skills, and prepare you for a key aspect of modern engineering practice.

You will develop key technical skills, enhance your creative thinking and learn from industry experts. As well as gaining knowledge and application skills in stress analysis, powertrain systems, suspension, body engineering, design and management. You’ll be learning in a stimulating environment with lots of opportunity to collaborate with your colleagues, enhance your creativity and develop the attributes you need to stand out from the crowd.

Our automotive engineering degree is structured so that its themes have a direct relevance to the industry’s current and expected future needs, and upon graduating you will have the intellectual, technical and personal qualities necessary to successfully implement new technologies. Throughout your course you will benefit from our strong industry links with companies such as the Morgan Motor Company, Westfield Sportscars, Siemens, and GKN. You will also have the opportunity to join our BCU Formula Student racing team, which designs and builds a single-seater racing car each year to race in July at the IMechE-sponsored event at Silverstone.

how to apply

Year 1: In order to complete this programme a student must successfully complete all the following

CORE modules (totalling 120 credits):

➢ Engineering Principles 1 20 credits

The module aims to provide the underpinning knowledge and problem solving skills in engineering science to enable you to progress to the next module in the theme, Engineering Principles II, and then on to the second year of a range of engineering degrees.

As the practical aspects of engineering science are delivered in another theme of the common first year, the Engineering Principles modules concentrate on the theoretical aspects. The subject material will be delivered in two coherent streams one of which contains predominantly mechanical science and the other contains predominantly electrical science.

➢ Mathematic Modelling: 20 credits

Mathematics plays a key role in establishing and grounding the skills of an engineer, and the ability to communicate the ideas of engineering that are expected of an engineering graduates.
The primary aim of this module is to provide the fundamental mathematical knowledge and techniques needed in order to enable you to use and apply such mathematical techniques for the evaluation, analysis, modelling and solution of realistic engineering problems. Application of these data sets has to include their interpretation both to and from the mathematical language. In addition, this module will introduce students to mathematical modelling software package. This will be used to plot, annotate basic signals and write simple programs to compute mathematical problems.

This module will develop your ability to both work on and communicate engineering realities to a wider audience, at a professional standard.

➢ Engineering Practice 1 20 credits

The module aims to provide the practical and professional skills to enable you to progress to the next module in the practical theme, Practical Skills II, and then on to the second year of an engineering degree. As the theoretical aspects of physical science and maths are delivered in other themes of the first year, the Practical Skills modules concentrate on the practical aspects.
The subject material will be delivered in three coherent streams one of which contains predominantly mechanical and electrical laboratory exercises, a second PC-based stream

will include use of software to support project planning, communication and analysis and the third, a project space where you have the opportunity to integrate learning from across all elements of the semester.

➢ Engineering Principles 2 20 credits

The module aims to provide the underpinning knowledge and problem solving skills in engineering science to enable you to progress to the second year of a wide range of engineering degrees. As the practical aspects of engineering science are delivered in another theme of the common first year, the Engineering Principles modules concentrate on the theoretical aspects. The subject material will be delivered in two coherent streams one of which contains predominantly mechanical science and the other contains predominantly electrical science.

➢ Mathematical Modelling 2 20 credits

This module will focus on introducing and building on well-established techniques for mathematically modelling dynamic systems (systems of interest for engineering) for contextualised engineering applications. The module will include an introduction to sophisticated signal analysis technique, Fourier series which is used to transform time- domain signals into their frequency spectra. The module is structured to include a mixture of lectures, tutorials and PC-based laboratories. The lectures will formally introduce material, in tutorials students will work through questions with tutor. The PC laboratories will involve using mathematical modelling software packages to implement mathematical operations.

➢ Integrated Engineering Project: 20 credits

The module aims to provide the practical and professional skills to enable you to progress on to the second year of an engineering degree. As the theoretical aspects of physical science and maths are delivered in other themes of the first year, the Practical Skills modules concentrate on the practical aspects.
The subject material will be delivered in three coherent streams one of which contains predominantly mechanical and electrical laboratory exercises, a second PC-based stream will include use of software to support project planning, design, communication and analysis and the third, a project space where you have the opportunity to integrate learning from across all elements of the semester.

Year 2: In order to complete this programme a student must successfully complete all the following CORE modules (totalling 120 credits):

➢ Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics 20 credit

The module aims to provide a basic understanding of thermodynamic and fluid mechanic concepts. The understanding of the transfer of energy within thermodynamic systems and the incurred losses is vital to improve efficiencies of such systems, especially in light of growing environmental concerns and increased economic cost. The knowledge and understanding will be gained through a balanced mixture of lectures and tutorials, whereby the learning will be supported by experiments.

  • ➢  Numerical Analysis 20 credits

    The module introduces the mathematical concepts such as transform calculus and matrix theory used to solve systems of first and second order differential equations underpinning the engineering disciplines undertaken within the Faculty.

    This provides you with the capability of modelling systems using both the transfer function and state space paradigms. In particular, you will be able to model linear systems in continuous and discrete time as well as by frequency response methods.

    Teaching and assessment will comprise not only traditional lectures and tutorials but also provide training in industry standard software for problem solving within coursework assessment.

  • ➢  Design and Materials 20 credit

    The module provides you with the opportunity to learn about design, sustainable development, teamwork and communication whilst contributing towards real international development projects.

    You will also gain the ability to communicate design ideas and practical details, to evaluate and apply both tangible and subjective feedback, and to conceive, design, implement and operate practical solutions to design opportunities.

    It is anticipated that the project vehicle for this module will be the Engineers without Borders Design for People Challenge.

  • ➢  Leading Engineering Endeavour 20 credits

    An interdisciplinary module, you will work with students from all fields of engineering to develop skills in engineering leadership and experience creating a purposeful vision and delivering on that vision. This will set the professional skills for business in context by combining your technical course-specific knowledge with professional skills. It is proposed that the vehicle to deliver this will be the biomimicry global design challenge.

  • ➢  Design and Manufacture 20 credits

    This module develops your research skills, idea generation techniques, and ability to create CAD models and manufactured components. You will also gain the ability to communicate design ideas and practical details, to evaluate and apply both tangible and

subjective feedback, and to conceive, design, implement and operate practical solutions to design opportunities.

➢ Mechanical Science 20 credits

The Mechanical Science module applies the principles of engineering, physics, and materials science to the design, analysis, manufacture, and maintenance of mechanical systems and components. It is a branch of engineering that enables you to design, produce, and operate machinery. In keeping with the programme philosophy the module encourages learning through the practical application of fundamental mechanical science principles to the analysis and solution real world problems.

Year 3: In order to complete this programme a student must successfully complete all the following CORE modules (totalling 120 credits):

➢ Computer Aided Engineering 20 credits

In the development cycle of new and existing components, processes and systems the use of computer analysis has a strong role to play. Reduced lead times can mean faster arrival at the market than competitors and therefore gaining an advantage. Engineers are at the centre of the development process and therefore require a good understanding of the key aspects of computer aided engineering (CAE).

This module will expose you to key aspects of computer aided engineering with regards to the fundamental principles behind the screen, the selection of appropriate boundary conditions and methods for a solution, as well as raising awareness of the limitations of CAE.

  • Vehicle Electronics and Control 20 credits

    The module presents the analysis, modelling and design of modern vehicle instrumentation and control systems. Industry-standard software will be used for the design and calibration of engine, vehicle, driveline and emissions after-treatment control systems using both time and frequency domain techniques.

    Teaching and assessment will comprise not only use of industry standard software for the purposes of mathematical modelling, but also traditional lectures/tutorials assessed by examination.

  • Body and Chassis Performance 20 credits

    Automobile design is experiencing a period of dynamic change. Alternative power- trains, fuels, materials, safety needs, and consumer demands for increased refinement

will have a profound effect upon body architecture. The emphasis for this module will be on gaining insight into auto body structural behaviour and the relationship to the vehicle.

Body structure element behaviour will be examined including thin walled members, panels, joints, spot welds, and local attachments.

• Powertrain and Hybrid Vehicles 20 credits

In times of consumer – and legislation-driven demand for increased fuel efficiency and reduced emissions of vehicles, the complexity in the development of future powertrains increases. A good understanding of powertrain sub-system behaviour is required to solve such complex systems. The module therefore aims to allow you to gain understanding of current technologies, but also an inside in emerging and future technologies to address the problems of future transportation. Formal lectures, tutorials, hands-on experience in labs and solving of problem based scenarios will enhance the learning process.

➢ Individual Honours Project 40 credits

The purpose of the module is to enable you to undertake a sustained, in-depth and research-informed project exploring an area that is of personal interest to you. In agreement with your supervisor, you will decide upon your topic which will take the form of a practical outcome (artefact) with accompanying contextual material. The main consideration when choosing your topic is that it must be aligned to the programme you are studying, and you should consider the relevance of this topic to your future academic or professional development .

At this level, you will be expected to work independently but you will receive additional one-to-one support from your supervisor, who will be familiar with your chosen topic area. As you progress on the module, extra support will be available and this may take the form of group seminars, workshops and online materials that will help to develop your project.

Year 4: In order to complete this programme a student must successfully complete all the following CORE modules (totalling 120 credits):

➢ Advanced Powertrains and Control 20 credits

You will analyse, model and simulate state of the art alternative power units, such as petrol and diesel engines, the impact of alternative fuels/ hybrid systems. Controllers may then be designed for required emissions regulation, fuel economy, and performance. In particular, the potential exists for the application of modern controllers to coordinate and control APUs and their associated subsystems.

  • ➢  Advanced Systems Engineering 20 credits

    This module provides you with an awareness of advanced structural techniques used for study of deformable solids, a general knowledge of the techniques employed and skills to perform analysis for selected solid components and structures. It aims to provide you with the following: the skills and confidence to perform advanced analysis of solid components and structures; the knowledge of selected advanced analysis techniques employed on the more common components and structures; and an understanding of the behaviour of solids under two or three dimensional stress fields, and the limitations imposed by assumptions and boundary conditions.

  • ➢  Vehicle Control Systems 20 credits

    This module offers you an opportunity to model, control and design vehicles using modern simulation and control strategies within an appropriate software environment for ABS, active suspension, power steering and stability systems.

  • ➢  Advanced Dynamics 20 credits

    The Automotive and Mechanical Engineering programmes share the common philosophy of one which aims to provide engineers with a rigorous grounding in industrial standard design, analysis and simulation capability. This module is consistent with this approach since it directly includes content and resources that specifically help you meet these needs.

    A principal aim of both programmes is to respond to the market need for engineers who are competent and skilled in the use of advanced computer modelling and simulation techniques. This module delivers against this aim, providing you with a thorough technology grounding supported by directly relevant design, simulation and analysis experiences.

  • ➢  Group Integrated Master’s Project 40 credits

    The purpose of the module is to enable you to undertake a sustained, in-depth and research-informed group project exploring an area that is of personal interest to you. In agreement with your supervisor, your group will decide upon your topic which will take the form of a practical outcome (artefact) with accompanying contextual material. The main consideration when choosing your group’s topic is that it must be aligned to the programme you are studying, and you should consider the relevance of this topic to your future academic or professional development.

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