BEng Mechanical Engineering

BEng (Hons) Mechanical Engineering degree will develop you as a skilled engineer capable of undertaking mechanical engineering tasks within and across organisations. The course focuses on the importance of sustainable futures and the global STEM agenda, in order to give you the knowledge and attributes you will need to thrive in this ever-changing industry.

You’ll work on industry-standard analytical tools, develop your design skills, as well as exploring a wide range of facilities.

Our engineering courses focus on project-based activities, giving you lots of opportunity to work in teams on projects from design to implementation. This will give you practical experience of applying engineering science to real world problems, working in multidisciplinary teams to develop your interpersonal skills, and prepare you for a key aspect of modern engineering practice. Problem solving and project management are key skills for an engineer, and our focus on practical experience will help to improve your skills in these highly sought after areas.

During your studies, you will use the latest tools and technologies, developing new skills at an advanced level. The course will encourage your creative thinking and develop your engineering leadership skills. Building on a foundation of the generic skills required by tomorrow’s engineers, you will also explore the wider context of engineering, as well as the application of advanced engineering principles to solve problems through research and development. You’ll engage in independent study and systematic enquiry at an advanced level and take responsibility for the conclusions drawn from it.

You will have lots of opportunity to apply industry-standard modelling and simulation techniques to the analysis, specification and design of mechanical engineering systems so that you are able to apply your knowledge and theory to a practical situation. In this way, we make sure you are ready to step straight into employment.

how to apply

Year 1: In order to complete this programme a student must successfully complete all the following CORE modules (totalling 120 credits):

  • Engineering Principles 1 – 20 credits

The module aims to provide the underpinning knowledge and problem solving skills in engineering science to enable you to progress to the next module in the theme, Engineering Principles II, and then on to the second year of a range of engineering degrees.

As the practical aspects of engineering science are delivered in another theme of the common first year, the Engineering Principles modules concentrate on the theoretical aspects. The subject material will be delivered in two coherent streams one of which contains predominantly mechanical science and the other contains predominantly electrical science.

  • Engineering Practice 1 – 20 credits

The module aims to provide the practical and professional skills to enable you to progress to the next module in the practical theme, Practical Skills II, and then on to the second year of an engineering degree. As the theoretical aspects of physical science and maths are delivered in other themes of the first year, the Practical Skills modules concentrate on the practical aspects.

The subject material will be delivered in three coherent streams one of which contains predominantly mechanical and electrical laboratory exercises, a second PC-based stream will include use of software to support project planning, communication and analysis and the third, a project space where you have the opportunity to integrate learning from across all elements of the semester.

  • Mathematic Modelling:  20 credits

Mathematics plays a key role in establishing and grounding the skills of an engineer, and the ability to communicate the ideas of engineering that are expected of an engineering graduates.

The primary aim of this module is to provide the fundamental mathematical knowledge and techniques needed in order to enable you to use and apply such mathematical techniques for the evaluation, analysis, modelling and solution of realistic engineering problems. Application of these data sets has to include their interpretation both to and from the mathematical language. In addition, this module will introduce students to mathematical modelling software package. This will be used to plot, annotate basic signals and write simple programs to compute mathematical problems.

This module will develop your ability to both work on and communicate engineering realities to a wider audience, at a professional standard.

  • Engineering Principles 2  – 20 credits

The module aims to provide the underpinning knowledge and problem solving skills in engineering science to enable you to progress to the second year of a wide range of engineering degrees. As the practical aspects of engineering science are delivered in another theme of the common first year, the Engineering Principles modules concentrate on the theoretical aspects. The subject material will be delivered in two coherent streams one of which contains predominantly mechanical science and the other contains predominantly electrical science.

  • Mathematical Modelling 2 20 credits

This module will focus on introducing and building on well-established techniques for mathematically modelling dynamic systems (systems of interest for engineering) for contextualised engineering applications. The module will include an introduction to sophisticated signal analysis technique, Fourier series which is used to transform time-domain signals into their frequency spectra. The module is structured to include a mixture of lectures, tutorials and PC-based laboratories. The lectures will formally introduce material, in tutorials students will work through questions with tutor. The PC laboratories will involve using mathematical modelling software packages to implement mathematical operations.

  • Integrated Engineering Project: 20 credits

The module aims to provide the practical and professional skills to enable you to progress on to the second year of an engineering degree. As the theoretical aspects of physical science and maths are delivered in other themes of the first year, the Practical Skills modules concentrate on the practical aspects.
The subject material will be delivered in three coherent streams one of which contains predominantly mechanical and electrical laboratory exercises, a second PC-based stream will include use of software to support project planning, design, communication and analysis and the third, a project space where you have the opportunity to integrate learning from across all elements of the semester.

Year 2: In order to complete this programme a student must successfully complete all the following CORE modules (totalling 120 credits):

  • Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics – 20 credit

The module aims to provide a basic understanding of thermodynamic and fluid mechanic concepts. The understanding of the transfer of energy within thermodynamic systems and the incurred losses is vital to improve efficiencies of such systems, especially in light of growing environmental concerns and increased economic cost.

The knowledge and understanding will be gained through a balanced mixture of lectures and tutorials, whereby the learning will be supported by experiments.

  • Design and Materials – 20 credit

The module provides you with the opportunity to learn about design, sustainable development, teamwork and communication whilst contributing towards real international development projects.

You will also gain the ability to communicate design ideas and practical details, to evaluate and apply both tangible and subjective feedback, and to conceive, design, implement and operate practical solutions to design opportunities.

 

  • Numerical Analysis – 20 credits

The module introduces the mathematical concepts such as transform calculus and matrix theory used to solve systems of first and second order differential equations underpinning the engineering disciplines undertaken within the Faculty.

This provides you with the capability of modelling systems using both the transfer function and state space paradigms. In particular, you will be able to model linear systems in continuous and discrete time as well as by frequency response methods.

Teaching and assessment will comprise not only traditional lectures and tutorials but also provide training in industry standard software for problem solving within coursework assessment.

  • Leading Engineering Endeavour – 20 credits

An interdisciplinary module, you will work with students from all fields of engineering to develop skills in engineering leadership and experience creating a purposeful vision and delivering on that vision. This will set the professional skills for business in context by combining your technical course-specific knowledge with professional skills.

  • Mechanical Science – 20 credits

The Mechanical Science module applies the principles of engineering, physics, and materials science to the design, analysis, manufacture, and maintenance of mechanical systems and components. It is a branch of engineering that enables you to design, produce, and operate machinery. In keeping with the programme philosophy the module encourages learning through the practical application of fundamental mechanical science principles to the analysis and solution real world problems. The course is delivered by way of an introductory lecture to a particular real world problem, such as vibration, and the underlying mechanical science principles used to tackle the problem. You will then engage in interactive tutorials where you will practice applying underlying mechanical science principles to real world problems.

  • Design and Manufacture – 20 credits

This module develops your research skills, idea generation techniques, and ability to create CAD models and manufactured components. You will also gain the ability to communicate design ideas and practical details, to evaluate and apply both tangible and subjective feedback, and to conceive, design, implement and operate practical solutions to design opportunities.

Year 3: In order to complete this programme a student must successfully complete all the following CORE modules (totalling 120 credits):

 

  • Computer Aided Engineering – 20 credits

In the development cycle of new and existing components, processes and systems the use of computer analysis has a strong role to play. Reduced lead times can mean faster arrival at the market than competitors and therefore gaining an advantage. Engineers are at the centre of the development process and therefore require a good understanding of the key aspects of computer aided engineering (CAE).This module will expose you to key aspects of computer aided engineering with regards to the fundamental principles behind the screen, the selection of appropriate boundary conditions and methods for a solution, as well as raising awareness of the limitations of CAE.

  • Dynamics and Control – 20 credits                

The module introduces you to the mathematical tools underpinning the analysis, modelling and design of complex vibrating systems and mechanisms as well as the software tools within an appropriate simulation environment used for their solution. Industry standard software will also be used for the design of dynamical control systems using both time and frequency domain techniques

Teaching and assessment will comprise not only traditional lectures/tutorials, but also use of industry standard software for the purposes of mathematical modelling, all of which are assessed by examination.

  • Advanced Mechanics – 20 credits

Mechanical engineers nowadays solve problems of high and multidisciplinary complexity. Although computational solutions generally lead to reliable results, the engineer should always attempt to validate the findings by alternative methods. This requires a thorough understanding of the underlying problems, but also the approach of reasonable simplification of complex systems without compromising validity.

  • Thermodynamics and Power and Energy Systems – 20 credits

The dependency of the current economy of fossil fuels as source of power requires a shift in thinking by engineers and companies to design and develop more efficient machines, processes and systems. The module therefore aims to provide you with the knowledge and understanding required to analyse thermodynamic systems concerned with conversion processes between heat and work. In addition the issues and limitations of the energy generation process play also a vital part and how energy can be recovered from processes to improve the overall efficiency. The module follows the Mechanical Engineering programme philosophy of developing your intellectual and practical competence in the thermodynamic, power generation and energy conversion aspects of mechanical engineering. Formal lectures, tutorials, hands-on experience in labs and solving of problem based scenarios will enhance the learning process.

  • Individual Honours Project – 40 credits

The purpose of the module is to enable you to undertake a sustained, in-depth and research-informed project exploring an area that is of personal interest to you. In agreement with your supervisor, you will decide upon your topic which will take the form of a practical outcome (artefact) with accompanying contextual material. The main consideration when choosing your topic is that it must be aligned to the programme you are studying, and you should consider the relevance of this topic to your future academic or professional development .At this level, you will be expected to work independently but you will receive additional one-to-one support from your supervisor, who will be familiar with your chosen topic area. As you progress on the module, extra support will be available and this may take the form of group seminars, workshops and online materials that will help to develop your project.

Year 4 ( MEng Only) : In order to complete this programme a student must successfully complete all the following CORE modules (totalling 120 credits):

  • Group Integrated Master’s Project – 40 credits

The purpose of the module is to enable you to undertake a sustained, in-depth and research-informed group project exploring an area that is of personal interest to you. In agreement with your supervisor, your group will decide upon your topic which will take the form of a practical outcome (artefact) with accompanying contextual material. The main consideration when choosing your group’s topic is that it must be aligned to the programme you are studying, and you should consider the relevance of this topic to your future academic or professional development.

  • Advanced Systems Engineering – 20 credits

This module provides you with an awareness of advanced structural techniques used for study of deformable solids, a general knowledge of the techniques employed and skills to perform analysis for selected solid components and structures. It aims to provide you with the following: the skills and confidence to perform advanced analysis of solid components and structures; the knowledge of selected advanced analysis techniques employed on the more common components and structures; and an understanding of the behaviour of solids under two or three dimensional stress fields, and the limitations imposed by assumptions and boundary conditions.

  • Control Engineering – 20 credits

The module utilises the mathematical concepts such as transform calculus and matrix theory used to model systems using both the transfer function and state-space paradigms. You will then be able to design controllers for linear systems using time and frequency response methods, in particular, pole placement techniques will be applied using both input-output and state-feedback approaches. These will then be extended to observer design and LQR optimization.

Teaching and assessment will comprise not only of traditional lectures and tutorials, but also the use of industry standard software for problem solving.

  • Advanced Dynamics – 20 credits

The Automotive and Mechanical Engineering programmes share the common philosophy of one which aims to provide engineers with a rigorous grounding in industrial standard design, analysis and simulation capability. This module is consistent with this approach since it directly includes content and resources that specifically help you meet these needs.

A principal aim of both programmes is to respond to the market need for engineers who are competent and skilled in the use of advanced computer modelling and simulation techniques. This module delivers against this aim, providing you with a thorough technology grounding supported by directly relevant design, simulation and analysis experiences.

  • Thermofluids – 20 credits

This module provides you with the opportunity to learn about the Fundamentals of Thermofluids: the conservation laws and their application, viscosity and the constitutive equations, boundary layers, turbulence and thermofluid properties. Computational Fluid Dynamics. Overview of discretisation methods: FD, FE, FV etc. The finite volume method of discretisation. Newtonian and non-Newtonian flows, boundary layers, turbulence, compressible flows, flows with heat transfer. Validation of CFD.

Entry Requirements

Send Us A Message

Thank you for your message. Will get in touch with you soon
There was an error trying to send your message. Please try again later.

Call Us

Our lines are open for registrations, support, and general inquiries.

Email Us

Send us an email at any time with your inquiry, or use the form on this page. We aim to respond at our earliest.